The student newspaper and broadcast of Cedar Park High School

The Wolfpack

The student newspaper and broadcast of Cedar Park High School

The Wolfpack

The student newspaper and broadcast of Cedar Park High School

The Wolfpack

Smiling for a picture, senior identical twins Ethan and Drew pose with a statue of a parrot mascot. The twins will both attend the University of Arkansas in the fall and major in business. “I didnt really mind going to different colleges, but we had the same [college] choices,” Ethan said. “We both liked Arkansas, and I dont mind him coming with me. If we cant get [a] rooming situation down, were just going to do a quad together. Which Im kind of down for a quad, because there is more room.” Photo courtesy of Drew O’Conner
Both Were Born to Ball
Kacey Miller, Editor-in-Chief • May 21, 2024

An opposing defender readies to...

Standing on the drum major’s platform, senior twin sisters Abby and Courtney McDanald pose for a picture. This fall, Abby will attend the University of Texas at Austin to study nursing and Courtney will major in theater education at Stephen F. Austin University. “I was definitely sad about [attending different universities] because weve been so close,” Abby said. “Being that far away from someone for a long time will be hard. We didnt do it on purpose, we just wanted different things in schools. Its definitely sad, but I think itll make seeing her more special.” Photo courtesy of Abby McDanald
Musical Machines
Kacey Miller, Editor-in-Chief • May 21, 2024

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Parking Lot Attendant Alan Gallagher poses next to his sign notifying that students can no longer purchase parking passes. Students without passes will not be able to park in the school parking lot, and if they do, AP’s will be notified. ““[When I catch people skipping] I notify the students AP and from there Im not sure what happens,” Gallagher said. “[I can also stop people for] speeding through the parking lot [since] the speed limit is 10 mph on campus.”
Confining the Chaos
Heidi Williams, Reporter • May 21, 2024

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Following through, senior Kade Davis throws a pitch in the game against Lockhart on March 26. Davis threw the first no hitter in Timberwolf Baseball history that night as the team won 15-0. “I was pumped, our team was pumped, everybody was happy, and we were winning the ball game,” Davis said. ““During the game I tried not to think about it because youre not supposed to think about a no hitter while youre still in the game or you could jinx it. I was just worried about winning the game, I didn’t care so much about the no hitter during the game, I just wanted to win.” Photo by Jim Cowlishaw
No Hitter, No Problem
Alyssa Fox, Reporter • May 21, 2024

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Smiling for the camera, Junior Adhit Eswaramoorthi and his fellow DECA member Justin Khadivi and Aryan Anarkat as they stay in their room during the state competition in Houston. Eswaramoorthi, Anarkat, and Rushil Mehta participated in the event Franchise Business Plans and advanced to the DECA International Competition. “I think being in DECA and talking to different people from different schools allowed me to expand how I view and go about meeting new people, Eswaramoorthi said. Which connects to robotics and the work ethic you have to have.
The Man, the Myth, The Legend
Penny Moreno, Reporter • May 21, 2024

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Senior Andrew Giguere strikes a pose with his car before prom in April. Giguere said he’s proud of his car after saving money for a year. “I really like the way it looks,” Giguere said. “I looked at a lot of cars before buying this one, but the Mustang was my best bet.” Photo Courtesy of Andrew Giguere
A Penny Saved is a Sports Car Earned
Raegan Ford, Guest Reporter • May 21, 2024

Hours spent working, and months...

Both Were Born to Ball

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Theatre Program Advances to Districts, Performs “Frankenstein”
On+March+20%2C+the+theatre+program+performed+their+UIL+One+Act+play+Frankenstein.+%E2%80%9CI+could+barely+believe+what+I+heard+after+%5Bit+was%5D+announced+that+we+were+advancing%2C%E2%80%9D+freshman+Zack+Williams+said.+%E2%80%9CIt+was+crazy.+Being+one+of+the+only+freshmen+in+the+show+and+also+%5Bbeing%5D+a+lead+definitely+put+pressure+on+my+shoulders.+I+knew+that+the+only+thing+I+could+do+was+my+best%2C+but+that+was+until+I+started+to+think+what+if+my+best+was+not+enough%3F+I+was+feeling+like+I+could+never+amount+to+being+what+%5Beveryone+else%5D+thought+I+was.+Although%2C+after+hearing+that+announcement%2C+I+realized+that+maybe+I+have+something+going+for+me+after+all.%E2%80%9D%0A%0APhoto+courtesy+of+Cayden+Bartolo
On March 20, the theatre program performed their UIL One Act play “Frankenstein”. “I could barely believe what I heard after [it was] announced that we were advancing,” freshman Zack Williams said. “It was crazy. Being one of the only freshmen in the show and also [being] a lead definitely put pressure on my shoulders. I knew that the only thing I could do was my best, but that was until I started to think what if my best was not enough? I was feeling like I could never amount to being what [everyone else] thought I was. Although, after hearing that announcement, I realized that maybe I have something going for me after all.” Photo courtesy of Cayden Bartolo

The crowd erupts into applause as the curtains come to a close at the front of the stage. Heavily breathing due to a physically-taxing end scene, the cast sighs with relief as they realize all of their hours of practice have finally paid off.

The theatre program performed their UIL One Act Play “Frankenstein” on March 20. Advancing past zone, the first round of UIL performances, the cast and crew were extremely excited to get another chance to perform at districts on March 23.

“I could barely believe what I heard after [it was] announced that we were advancing,” freshman Zack Williams said. “It was crazy. Being one of the only freshmen in the show and also [being] a lead definitely put pressure on my shoulders. I knew that the only thing I could do was my best, but that was until I started to think what if my best was not enough? I was feeling like I could never amount to being what [everyone else] thought I was. Although, after hearing that announcement, I realized that maybe I have something going for me after all.”

Last year, the program performed “The Children’s Hour” and were disappointed when they realized the play did not advance past zone. Taking this year as a chance for redemption, the cast and crew poured hours of hard work into preparing for the moment they would get to show everyone what their program was really about.

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“As my last show, it was such an accomplishment and a milestone to hear that we were advancing past zone,” senior Michael Zolidis said. “It was a very rewarding moment and I wouldn’t have wanted to end my senior year of theatre any other way.”

During the casting process, about 50 students came to audition for roles, with about three or four auditioning for each part. After performing his chosen scene for his audition, senior Cayden Bartolo said he was stoked to learn that he would play Frankenstein.

“Oh man, I was on cloud nine,” Bartolo said. “Getting the lead was definitely an achievement because I’ve always wanted to be the lead. I had a lead in freshman year but because it was COVID year, I wasn’t able to perform in front of people like I would have liked [to]. This play has a lot of drama, a lot of emotion and a lot of physical movement, which I was excited and prepared for.”

As the weeks got closer to the UIL performance, rehearsals were four days a week for four hours at a time. The entire program would run through the play multiple times in one rehearsal, attempting to perfect every scene.

“Every rehearsal was like a workout,” Williams said. “Since my character rarely stopped moving at all and involved a lot of stage violence, it was a struggle getting through. Every full run-through ended with everything feeling sore and feeling exhausted out of my mind.”

As the cast and crew spent hours upon hours with each other preparing for the play, friendships developed. Bartolo believes that the reason this play did as well as it did was because the on-stage relationships between the cast was not just acting.

“I worked a lot with my cast members outside of just rehearsal,” Bartolo said. “Previously, I would just show up to rehearsal and go home. But, I stayed in contact with all of my cast members throughout the play so we could talk. I tried to stay connected with those people so that on stage, our friendship seemed more realistic and genuine.”

Dominating the awards this year, the UIL One Act play received Best Technical Crew overall, and senior Katie Higdon received All Star Crew. Additionally, junior Kaitlyn Moore and senior Cadence Teicher received honorable mentions for All Star Cast. Sophomore Anson Schalles and Bartolo were awarded with All Star Cast for their performance.

“Our play’s technical elements were more advanced than other schools in our area,” Bartolo said. “Our set, makeup, and costumes really made the play what it was. Especially as an actor, whenever you have the costumes and the makeup, you can really feel your character.”

Considering the gore and violence within the play, the air felt tense and gasps could be heard from the audience, according to Bartolo. For Bartolo and the rest of the crew, the audience’s reaction was the best part of the performance.

“I enjoyed being a part of [the play] and seeing it come together,” Zolidis said. “From backstage I was able to hear the occasional gasp from the audience, which was super cool to know that they were enjoying something we had put so much time into.” 

The success that boomed from this play was largely due to the choice of “Frankenstein”. Differing from many plays in the past, “Frankenstein” was new and exciting for the directors, cast, crew, and audience. 

“This play is pretty macabre, being one of the most classic horror/tragedy stories of all time,” Williams said. “I’ve never really heard of anything like it being done at CPHS, other than our yearly haunted house, and it was a really special process that I hope will remember for a long time to come.”

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About the Contributor
Caroline Howard
Caroline Howard, Reporter
Caroline is a senior and a first year reporter. In addition to being a staff member for the Wolfpack, she is involved in many clubs around CPHS, with her main focus being Timberwolves for the Environment and Spanish Honor Society in which she holds officer positions. She enjoys learning and writing all about people's different perspectives. She hopes to attend the University of Washington next fall to major in Nursing. Some fun facts about Caroline include: her goldendoodle named Luna, her Dr. Pepper addiction, and her love for all music, her favorites being Taylor Swift and Kendrick Lamar. 

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