Student creates mural for Foster the People

Foster+the+People+mural+painted+by+sophomore+Nika+Torabi+on+her+own+bedroom+wall.++%22I+used+a+projector+for+the+mural%2C%22+Torabi+said.+%22I+didn%27t+want+to+make+any+mistakes.%22

Foster the People mural painted by sophomore Nika Torabi on her own bedroom wall. "I used a projector for the mural," Torabi said. "I didn't want to make any mistakes."

Emilee Guernsey, Reporter

Have you ever loved a band so much, you decided to dedicate a mural on your wall to them? Well, sophomore Nika Torabi has. Torabi started the mural on July 17, 2014 and just recently finished on Apr. 26, 2015.

The mural depicting the harsh life of someone in the spotlight was created after the band Foster the People were forced to cover up the same exact mural in Los Angeles, California due to a violation of permits. Fans made a petition to try and keep the mural up, but it only kept the mural up for two more weeks.

“Foster the People have such great music,” Torabi said. “They were my kind of my escape in middle school, and making this mural was something I could give back to them.”

When Foster the People came out with the song “Pumped up Kicks”, Torabi loved it so much, she felt as if she should look up more of their songs, starting her love for the band.

“I don’t normally look up information on bands, but I felt like I should for Foster the People,” Torabi said. “I found more of their songs, and instantly fell in love. Their lyrics really spoke to me.”

Surprisingly the piece of art Torabi created, was her first time being “artistic.” Torabi used a projector to make the mural on the wall, this way she could make it exactly the way the mural was in L.A.

“I used the projector to make the mural,” Torabi said. “I wanted to get all of the details and not mess up.”

Not only did Torabi believe that preserving the mural in L.A. was important, she also believes that preserving any art in general is important.

“If someone had the time to paint something so great, it would be crazy to destroy it,” Torabi said. “Even if I move I wouldn’t paint over my wall because it’s still a really cool piece of art.”