The student newspaper and broadcast of Cedar Park High School

The Wolfpack

The student newspaper and broadcast of Cedar Park High School

The Wolfpack

The student newspaper and broadcast of Cedar Park High School

The Wolfpack

Smiling for a picture, senior identical twins Ethan and Drew pose with a statue of a parrot mascot. The twins will both attend the University of Arkansas in the fall and major in business. “I didnt really mind going to different colleges, but we had the same [college] choices,” Ethan said. “We both liked Arkansas, and I dont mind him coming with me. If we cant get [a] rooming situation down, were just going to do a quad together. Which Im kind of down for a quad, because there is more room.” Photo courtesy of Drew O’Conner
Both Were Born to Ball
Kacey Miller, Editor-in-Chief • May 21, 2024

An opposing defender readies to...

Standing on the drum major’s platform, senior twin sisters Abby and Courtney McDanald pose for a picture. This fall, Abby will attend the University of Texas at Austin to study nursing and Courtney will major in theater education at Stephen F. Austin University. “I was definitely sad about [attending different universities] because weve been so close,” Abby said. “Being that far away from someone for a long time will be hard. We didnt do it on purpose, we just wanted different things in schools. Its definitely sad, but I think itll make seeing her more special.” Photo courtesy of Abby McDanald
Musical Machines
Kacey Miller, Editor-in-Chief • May 21, 2024

At the end of a long Friday full...

Parking Lot Attendant Alan Gallagher poses next to his sign notifying that students can no longer purchase parking passes. Students without passes will not be able to park in the school parking lot, and if they do, AP’s will be notified. ““[When I catch people skipping] I notify the students AP and from there Im not sure what happens,” Gallagher said. “[I can also stop people for] speeding through the parking lot [since] the speed limit is 10 mph on campus.”
Confining the Chaos
Heidi Williams, Reporter • May 21, 2024

Once school gets out, it starts....

Following through, senior Kade Davis throws a pitch in the game against Lockhart on March 26. Davis threw the first no hitter in Timberwolf Baseball history that night as the team won 15-0. “I was pumped, our team was pumped, everybody was happy, and we were winning the ball game,” Davis said. ““During the game I tried not to think about it because youre not supposed to think about a no hitter while youre still in the game or you could jinx it. I was just worried about winning the game, I didn’t care so much about the no hitter during the game, I just wanted to win.” Photo by Jim Cowlishaw
No Hitter, No Problem
Alyssa Fox, Reporter • May 21, 2024

As he takes a deep breath, he rolls...

Smiling for the camera, Junior Adhit Eswaramoorthi and his fellow DECA member Justin Khadivi and Aryan Anarkat as they stay in their room during the state competition in Houston. Eswaramoorthi, Anarkat, and Rushil Mehta participated in the event Franchise Business Plans and advanced to the DECA International Competition. “I think being in DECA and talking to different people from different schools allowed me to expand how I view and go about meeting new people, Eswaramoorthi said. Which connects to robotics and the work ethic you have to have.
The Man, the Myth, The Legend
Penny Moreno, Reporter • May 21, 2024

He sits at his desk, focused and...

Senior Andrew Giguere strikes a pose with his car before prom in April. Giguere said he’s proud of his car after saving money for a year. “I really like the way it looks,” Giguere said. “I looked at a lot of cars before buying this one, but the Mustang was my best bet.” Photo Courtesy of Andrew Giguere
A Penny Saved is a Sports Car Earned
Raegan Ford, Guest Reporter • May 21, 2024

Hours spent working, and months...

Both Were Born to Ball

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The Staff Behind the Spreads

Yearbook Class Finishes Book, Releases Theme
Posing+with+their+%E2%80%9CFeatured+Yearbook%E2%80%9D+banner%2C+signifying+that+the+2022-2023+yearbook+is+used+as+an+example+for+other+yearbook+classes%2C+the+yearbook+team+smiles+at+the+camera.+Yearbooks+have+been+on+sale+for+%2480+all+school+year%2C+with+90+left+in+stock.+%E2%80%9CIm+really+happy+with+this+book%2C%E2%80%9D+content+editor+and+senior+James+Sanderson+said.+%E2%80%9CI+think+other+people+are+going+to+be+happy+with+it%3B+all+our+pages+look+really+cute.+Issues+are+a+thing%2C+but+we+have+them+every+single+year+and+we+dont+let+them+get+in+the+way.+We+work+on+a+very%2C+very+tight+schedule+and+theres+no+pushing+deadlines+back.+It%E2%80%99s+a+lot+of+fun%2C+though.+It+is+such+an+amazing+staff+and+a+very+engaging+team.+Its+very+fulfilling+work.%E2%80%9D+Photo+courtesy+of+Paige+Hert
Posing with their “Featured Yearbook” banner, signifying that the 2022-2023 yearbook is used as an example for other yearbook classes, the yearbook team smiles at the camera. Yearbooks have been on sale for $80 all school year, with 90 left in stock. “I’m really happy with this book,” content editor and senior James Sanderson said. “I think other people are going to be happy with it; all our pages look really cute. Issues are a thing, but we have them every single year and we don’t let them get in the way. We work on a very, very tight schedule and there’s no pushing deadlines back. It’s a lot of fun, though. It is such an amazing staff and a very engaging team. It’s very fulfilling work.” Photo courtesy of Paige Hert

He rings the classroom doorbell as he stands outside its door, the muffled sounds of a bustling yearbook room seeping through the door’s window. The door is opened by someone rushing by and he enters, phone in hand with the recording of the final quote needed for his page opened and ready. Maneuvering around rolling chairs of chatting staffers, focused typers and printed yearbook proofs, senior Content Editor James Sanderson takes a seat in his own chair, moves aside the Monster cans on the table and presses play on the recording.

The 2023-2024 Tracks Yearbook will be delivered to the school in early May for distribution to the student body by the yearbook staff. The staff is now working on a 16-page supplement that will cover the school events that happen after the yearbook deadline on March 22 and will be inserted into yearbooks once they arrive. This year, the theme of the yearbook is “TBD,” the abbreviation for “to be determined.”

“We chose the theme ‘TBD’ because last year was the school’s 25th year and we did a big school spirit book,” journalism teacher Paige Hert said. “After that, you’re kind of like, ‘what’s next?’ So we played off the idea that, like, we don’t know what’s next. A lot of the book plays off of abbreviations, too. I think it’s got a really cool design and we have a lot of great content and photography in it. I’m excited for the students to see it.”

Some of the designs of the yearbook include cornerless boxes, which represent student stories and plans that are yet to come, or TBD. As one of two content editors, Sanderson edited written content in the yearbook to make sure it fit journalistic standards of writing. He helped write many of the stories and captions in the book.

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“I’m really happy with this book,” Sanderson said. “I think other people are going to be happy with it; all our pages look really cute. Issues are a thing, but we have them every single year and we don’t let them get in the way. We work on a very, very tight schedule and there’s no pushing deadlines back. It’s a lot of fun, though. It is such an amazing staff and a very engaging team. It’s very fulfilling work.”

Yearbook staffers use Adobe InDesign to create their yearbook spreads, which are sets of yearbook pages they are assigned. Sophomore and first year staffer Addie LoSurdo had a soccer spread and a library showstopper this year. A showstopper is a spread that features unique content to the year, but may not be an every year edition, according to Hert. The library spread looks like a calendar and features the many clubs and activities that the library hosts. LoSurdo said her job on the yearbook staff is to take pictures at events, help out where she can and finish her spreads.

“We use our theme to position the spread elements and be creative with how we place our pictures, put our captions, put our quotes and everything using the theme designs,” LoSurdo said. “Every spread is different.”

According to Hert, who is also the newspaper adviser and UIL Journalism coach, this year the staff was a majority of first-year yearbook members.

This year’s book will come in three different color covers. (Paige Hert)

“It was a bit of a learning curve because we had a really large new staff population, so that was tough at first,” Hert said. “We had some issues with missed deadlines early on in the year, but everybody was able to work together to meet those deadlines with help from other people in the class. That is how the yearbook staff always is—there’s always help from each other to get things done.”

Interviews for students wanting to join the yearbook staff next year will take place in the next few weeks. Those interested in yearbook that have not signed up for the yearbook class can reach out to Hert or Sanderson for more information.

“We need kids that are willing to work hard, that know how to meet a deadline, or at least are willing to put the effort into meeting a deadline and kids that are not scared to talk to people,” Hert said. “This class is a lot of work, but it’s also a huge reward at the end of the year because you have a physical product that people keep on their shelves for years and years. This is one of the only classes in the entire school that will ever have anything like that. It’s definitely an experience. Sometimes stressful, but mostly fun.”

LoSurdo said she is going to try out for an editor position next year and hopes to be chosen to lead the staff.

“I love yearbook,” LoSurdo said. “It’s one of my favorite classes ever and I was really surprised I liked it. I was a little scared I was not going to like the people, but I literally bonded with everyone on the staff. People who normally I wouldn’t be friends with, I’ve become great friends with them. And I love the closeness of it, just getting to hang out and share everything with everybody. This year, we were super successful and did amazing. I’m proud of the yearbook, and I’m proud of everybody.”

Yearbooks have been on sale all school year at www.jostens.com. They are $80 and will sell until they are sold out, which happened last year. Yearbook anticipates distributing them the week of May 13-17, but will have more details about that in early May. To date, there are 90 yearbooks left for sale.

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About the Contributor
Kacey Miller
Kacey Miller, Editor-in-Chief
Kacey is a junior and third year reporter. She loves learning about her fellow students and writing about their stories. In addition to being a staff member for The Wolfpack, she is a UIL journalism competitor, the Cedar Park FFA Vice President and has a show lamb named Winnie. If she’s not at the barn or practicing for her FFA contests, she’s probably doing homework. You can find her at every football game, either in the stands or on the sidelines taking pictures. Some of her favorite memories are from reading the Bible with her little sisters. She plans to attend college somewhere cold, but also doesn’t want to be too far away from her family. Her favorite animal is a bear and sometimes she wishes she could hibernate like one.

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