Cashing in cans for Trunk or Treat

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Hannah Williamson

Sophomore Lindsey Foster helps young kids work with the sand pit. Spanish Club is one of the clubs that participated in Trunk or Treat and they had a sand pit that kids could dig through and find little treasures. “The children and their costumes are my favorite part because they are adorable,” Ayah Alomari said. “It truly makes your day.”

Anjali Sundaram, Reporter

Kids roam around while the sounds of children laughing and running fill the air. Many are dressed up as superheroes and princesses with their faces  covered in chocolate and candy as they sprint to all the games that the high school kids set up for them.

Trunk or Treat is a student council sponsored event where many clubs in the school get together and put together different activities for elementary school kids, that took place on Oct. 26.

“Trunk or Treat is a way for CPHS to show its diversity of expertise and talent,” junior and president of KEY club Ayah Alomari said. “Spanish Club, NEHS, PALS and many others all come to participate for a good cause and to represent our school with pride. It’s CPHS’s way of giving back to the community that gave so much to us.”

This year there were over 27 clubs that participated. Some clubs were AVID Club, which did an Alice in Wonderland bean bag toss, PALS, which did a Mummy contest with toilet paper and KEY Club, which set up a Tic-Tac-Toe toss.

“Key club, like many other clubs and organization, held their own ‘trunk’ or booth where we decorated the back of one of our officer’s trunks,” Alomari said. “The children could play the game and get candy. They were absolutely precious.”

Cedar Park raised over 400 cans to give to the Hill Country Food Bank for those in need. This was also the first year that Adam Babich was the teacher representative of Trunk or Treat, which encompassed some changes.

“This year we attempted to run the Trunk or Treat for an hour longer than last year,” Babich said. “I don’t think the payoff (number of attendees/cans) warranted the extra hour so next year we will return to a three hour event. We also used both sides of the faculty parking lot this year and accepted toiletries and clothes. ”

Trunk or Treat is an experience for both teens and children to interact and communicate in a capacity that is fun and rewarding.

One of the favorite moments of Trunk or Treat were the children running around in their costumes, according to Alomari. Alomari is not the only person to share these views, sophomore Audrey Roe also agrees that the children were the best part of Trunk or Treat.

“Seeing the all the little kids dressed up in costumes was definitely one of the highlights of Trunk or Treat,” Roe said.

Helping people through Trunk or Treat was amazing, according to Alomari, but there are also many other things that  should be taken away from the event,

“If there is anything we should take away from Trunk or Treat, it is the ability to communicate with club members, cute children, and their parents,” Alomari said.  “It’s an opportunity for students to experience a certain level of collaboration with other members that builds compatibility and teamwork.”