Actions to Last a Lifetime

Mr.Madu's Impact Lives on Through Students

Joseph+Maduneme+teaches+an+Engineering+class+during+the+2018-2019+school+year.+Courtesy+of+the+2019+Tracks+Yearbook
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Actions to Last a Lifetime

Joseph Maduneme teaches an Engineering class during the 2018-2019 school year. Courtesy of the 2019 Tracks Yearbook

Joseph Maduneme teaches an Engineering class during the 2018-2019 school year. Courtesy of the 2019 Tracks Yearbook

Shelby Lee

Joseph Maduneme teaches an Engineering class during the 2018-2019 school year. Courtesy of the 2019 Tracks Yearbook

Shelby Lee

Shelby Lee

Joseph Maduneme teaches an Engineering class during the 2018-2019 school year. Courtesy of the 2019 Tracks Yearbook

Isaiah Prophet, Reporter

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Teachers often play an important part in many people’s lives. Their lessons and teachings on responsibility and real-world issues can have a dramatic effect on society and how some grow as people. Former engineering teacher Joseph Madunume was no different, and according to his students, his impact is one that will never be forgotten.

Madu, as he was called by his students, taught for nine years at CPHS in Architectural Engineering. He also was the sponsor of seven clubs during his time here, many of which are still operational today. Madu passed away on July 27, 2019.

“I only knew Mr. Madu for a few months,” junior Jasmine Walker said. “I mainly knew him from the African American Heritage Club, but in the months that I knew him he always seemed happy, in a good mood or very upbeat. He was very nice and welcoming to new members and always had great ideas.”

Junior Stella Shipps, a student of Madu’s Intro to Engineering class and president of the African American Heritage Club claims he was more than just a kind person; he was a supportive and helpful teacher as well. He pushed his students to do their best, and helped them when they struggled.

You could see from everybody’s attitude entering and leaving his class that they were so excited to see him and so excited to learn, and they knew the he was genuinely invested in their success and was genuinely invested in them.”

— Tiffany Asha

“He truly set the example of what it means to be a teacher,” Shipps said. “He gave me a good foundation for my knowledge of that subject and was really supportive of me and all my ventures in the club.”

Senior Kate Lee, a member of Madu’s JETS club, as well as his Skills USA club and his National Technical Honor Society club, claims that without Madu she may not have even been interested in engineering. She said that his team building and leadership skills is what allowed JETS to advance to nationals.

“The initial reason I joined all three clubs was because of Madu,” Lee said. “And I don’t think I would have been exposed to engineering this much if he wasn’t my engineering teacher my freshman year. He was very friendly and genuine with all his students and was was willing to share his life stories and advice.”

Madu’s commitment to his school and community were not in doubt, according to art and photography teacher Tiffany Asha. She states that on top of sponsoring seven different clubs, he also volunteered at the Saint Williams Perish church and was an active member of his community.

“I used to see him in the hallway and he would just bring a smile to my face and just remind me of what is important in life.” Asha said. “What’s important in life is people, and how you treat them and being kind and he was the daily reminder of that. He will always have a special place in my heart. You could see from everybody’s attitude entering and leaving his class that they were so excited to see him and so excited to learn, and they knew the he was genuinely invested in their success and was genuinely invested in them. Madu was all about building those meaningful relationships with kids and making sure everybody felt welcomed.”